GARRISON PRINSLOW

Role:  Associate to Erik Halverson, Esq.

Admitted:  USPTO Patent Agent No. 71,889; Pending Admission to WA State Bar, 2020

Education:  BA Business Administration – Information Systems from the University of Washington; JD from Washington University in St. Louis School of Law; M.Eng. – Computer Science & Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis School of Engineering

Practice Areas:  Intellectual Property (Copyright, Trademark, and Patent Law); Small and Mid-Size Business Counsel; Cannabis Business Counsel

Garrison Prinslow is an Associate to Managing Attorney Erik Halverson, Esq. at Halverson Law, PLLC. He leverages his legal education, computer science and engineering background, and professional experience to assist the firm and its clients with complex legal and technical research questions. He has more than five years of experience in patent prosecution and is a former Patent Examiner in Computer Engineering with the United States Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO).

Garrison is a registered U.S. Patent Agent before the USPTO, allowing him to assist clients with applying for patent protection for their inventions. He also has a background helping small businesses, non-profits, and startups with initial formation, protecting their intellectual property (copyright, trademark, and patent), and advising on opportunities for licensing.

Garrison is originally from Seattle, WA but has also lived in Washington, D.C., Davis and Los Angeles, CA, St. Louis, MO, Hong Kong, and Munich, Germany. In his free time, he enjoys connecting with the local tech startup and gaming community, listening to music, learning new languages, playing video games, snowboarding, and tinkering with various gadgets.

Notable Achievements:

+ Witkin Award: Contracts, Fall 2008.
+ CALI Award: Patent Drafting, Spring 2010.

Professional Associations:

+ United States Patent Bar (Agent No. 71,889), 2013 – Present.

Publications:

+ “Overview of Performance Measurement and Analytical Modeling Techniques for Multi-core Processors” (Apr. 24, 2011), Washington University in St. Louis CSE Department